Are We Near the Bottom Yet?

[Copied from the blog I’m intending to update in the future: An Ingenious Device for Avoiding Thought:]

A minority President who only wants to represent his supporters has nominated a judge to the Supreme Court who has promised to take his revenge on the liberals and progressives he accuses of conspiring to fight his nomination. I bet no judicial nominee in recent American history has displayed a similar lack of judicial temperament during his confirmation hearings. Judge Kavanaugh’s lies and falsehoods may also have set a record.

This means we now have an unfit President who tells lie after lie selecting an unfit judge who won’t tell the truth about his life or his beliefs. We should all believe Kavanaugh, however, when he says he intends to have his revenge. Meanwhile, the Republican majority insists on treating a glorified job interview as if it’s a criminal trial where the defendant must be found guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

Democrats raised relatively few objections when this President nominated a staunch reactionary to the Supreme Court last year. Justice Neil Gorsuch now occupies a seat the Republicans successfully held open for a year, denying Obama’s highly respected nominee, Merrick Garland, a hearing. No women accused Gorsuch of assaulting or otherwise mistreating them. Yet the Republicans blame the Democrats when women do come forward to complain of Kavanaugh’s behavior. Are we near the bottom yet?

For further reading:

Shamus Khan, professor of sociology at Columbia University, explains that Kavanaugh is lying because of his upbringing [The Washington Post]. 

Alexandra Petri asks a rhetorical question in capital letters: “HOW DARE YOU DO THIS TO BRETT KAVANAUGH?” [The Washington Post].

Megan Garber discusses the “pernicious double standards” that protect the privileged from the consequences of their drinking and bad behavior [The Atlantic].

Nathan Robinson analyzes some of Kavanaugh’s testimony in detail and concludes that “this man shouldn’t serve another day as any kind of judge” [Current Affairs]. 

Jennifer Rubin, a conservative columnist, argues that “if we want to protect the Supreme Court’s integrity, Kavanaugh should not be on it [The Washington Post].

Eliot Cohen, professor of strategic studies at Johns Hopkins University, complains that his Republican Party has abandoned conservatism and that’s unfortunate for all of us [The Atlantic].

Even the editors of America, the Jesuit review, explain why the Kavanaugh nomination should be withdrawn [America]:

We continue to support the nomination of judges [who support a “textualist” interpretation of the Constitution]—but Judge Kavanaugh is not the only such nominee available. For the good of the country and the future credibility of the Supreme Court in a world that is finally learning to take reports of harassment, assault and abuse seriously, it is time to find a nominee whose confirmation will not repudiate that lesson.

November 6th, the date of the mid-term election, is only 37 days away. There may still be time to register to vote. You might be able to vote by mail. If we are going to have any checks and balances on the current administration, we need to elect Democrats up and down the ballot.

Okay, one more:

James Fallows explains what the President and Kavanaugh have in common. It isn’t pretty [The Atlantic].